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I was able to rescue four lights from a 1960’s house remodel that I have been working on. After replacing all the sockets, wiring, a few fasteners, and a bit of metal straightening and clean up, they are like new. If you look really close, you can see the little patterns of holes that add to the design around the fat part of the shade.

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Here is the finished light ready for install.
That’s not black paint, it’s black patina with a matte clear coat.

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This is a light I started building today for a client that requested the lighting to produce interesting rays of light in a small space.  I mocked it up with paper before I CNC plasma cut the pieces. Tomorrow it gets its guts and hopefully by next week the finish will be in place.

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So, apparently I’m in the craft of making hairpin legs for the people I care about… I may actually start producing them as a product, though there are far too many competitors out there.

My wife asked me to make four for our kids’ art table that she wanted to make as a Christmas present ti them. I made 16 instead. .. Four of them (for the kids’ art table) were made to be 20” high, painted matte turquoise on the top 5”, and clear lacquered the rest of the way down. The rest went to a few other projects for my older sister and I…

These seem to be superior to most of the commercially available units as the are made with 7/16” cold rolled steel (not 3/8” hot rolled steel), the top plates are 3/16” (not 1/8”  or 10ga.), and the legs are fillet welded at the base of the top plates AND plug welded on the top of the top plates. I made a couple of jigs that made the replication super consistent, and I can make them virtually any height.  The top plates were very easy to make, because I just plasma cut them all… I’m considering powder coating a few sets too…

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These are a few name frames that I made for a friend to give to his in laws for Christmas.  The top photo shows the completed look. They are all 18 gage cold rolled steel, that has been hammered out to mimic the sheet metal techniques of the craftsman who worked for Gaudi. The style is in reminiscence of the Casa Mila entrance doors, with my own design and fabrication stylings. The tiles were supplied and purchased by my friend while on holiday in Barcelona.  The black color of the finished frames was a chemical plating/patina that I used to turn the steel matte black. Enjoy!

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New toy for the new year. 
This compressor is ten times the compressor I used to have, even though they are both 60 gallon…

New toy for the new year.

This compressor is ten times the compressor I used to have, even though they are both 60 gallon…

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everydaycarry:


Apple iPhone 5
Pebble Smart Watch
Refractory Carbon Fiber Ring
Veleno Designs Quantum Ti
Swisstech Utilikey
LaCie Silver CooKey
NaoLoop
Fisher Space Pen
Midori Memorandum Card
Itoya Fresnel Lens
Protech Godfather

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Awesome shout out on the ring! Thank you!  Nice load out, carry well!
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wonderingalex:

shou-sugi-ban method

 shou-sugi-ban (焼杉板) 

(via theswindlr)

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sleeplessinldn:

Construction Lamp by Joost van Bleiswijk for Moooi

This may be a problem! Way too similar to a design that I have been prototyping for over a year now…

Update:
        Mine’s still cooler, though!

(via monstereatsdesign)

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This was a fun project!

My client is remodeling a 1960’s/70’s Arizona ranch house to fall into that rustic late mid-century modern design motif. I was asked to design three gates for the pool yard, and one security for for the master bedroom. After putting in my research, and running my brain down the washboard a few dozen times, this is what I came up with…   Enjoy!

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Last week I read a little article from an old Popular Mechanics magazine. The article explained how a person with limited tools and a kitchen stove could fashion a knife from an old file. I was half way through the article before I had started digging through my collection of bastard files to find one that I could part with.

I softened the metal as per the instructions over a stove (in this case, I used and old Coleman stove running “white gas”) until it was just past “blue” in color, and let it air cool.

I then drew out my design with a Sharpie, and cut it into shape with a 4-1/2” angle grinder. I chose a modified version of a tanto blade for several reasons, but that’s just my preference…

After cutting out its shape, I switched to a 120 grit flap wheel on the grinder, and did all the rest of the grinding with that (including the “glass breaker” on the tip of the tang).

Once everything was as it should be, I made up my own version of a paracord wrap for the handle, and then put the final edges on all three sharp sides.

At this point, I needed a way to transport and store the knife, and the article said nothing of what to use in that endeavour… So, after considering all the options of things and of materials I had in my shop, I came up with a patch of leather and got to work. By the way, this was my first leather project! After stitching it all up, and wet formed the sheath, and then grabbed my grommet kit and found a problem… All I had were bright brass grommets! I went back to my Coleman stove, and heated them up and quenched them in used motor oil, and then reheated them on the stove one last time to give them a nice “old” look. Let me note that the wet forming of the leather gave the sheath a VERY positive retention aspect, that made a retention strap/snap obsolete. 

When I got done trying not to cut myself playing with my new toy, I realized that the top stitches were vulnerable to the knife’s edge… This brings me to my last detail. I got out some copper wire, and gave the first stitch 6-8 laps, and now it’s done!

This project was super fun, and was actually free! I used only things that I had on-hand, and only pretty basic hand tools (an angle grinder is basic, right?). I am dying to make a few more now, and already know several things I would do different/ to improve the project.

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This was I little project that I did recently. 
I swapped out the plasma torch on my cnc plasma table for a router, and taught myself the programming to complete the sign. I had been wanting to try this ever since I got my table, and was finally given the opportunity when a local graphic designer came knocking. After some heavy thought, I got the router mounted and VERY slowly figured out how to make the program run the router.
The circle with the bird in it, is 1/4” hot rolled steel with a beeswax finish, and is flush with the surface of the wood.
The text near the bottom is 1/8” hot rolled steel, and also beeswaxed and sunk flush into the wood.

This was I little project that I did recently.

I swapped out the plasma torch on my cnc plasma table for a router, and taught myself the programming to complete the sign. I had been wanting to try this ever since I got my table, and was finally given the opportunity when a local graphic designer came knocking. After some heavy thought, I got the router mounted and VERY slowly figured out how to make the program run the router.

The circle with the bird in it, is 1/4” hot rolled steel with a beeswax finish, and is flush with the surface of the wood.

The text near the bottom is 1/8” hot rolled steel, and also beeswaxed and sunk flush into the wood.

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visualgraphic:

Intersection

by Thomas Merlin

Something to put in the vault, for inspiration.

(via monstereatsdesign)

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A credenza That I made for my wife for her birthday. Oh, and six shelves… If you look closely, the breaks between the shelves are staggered. This took more layout and attention to detail than you would believe! All of the shelf brackets are welded to the shelves, and had to be dead-on to hit studs. I chose to put the shelf brackets on top to act as bookends, and when books are actually in place, the shelf brackets disappear. This causes the viewer to see the lateral shelves as floating pieces of 10 gauge (1/8”) platforms with no obvious retainers.

The credenza is 3/4” square tubing, skinned with 14 gauge HRS, and the doors are 1/4” birch veneer plywood. I had to make custom bypass door tracks from scratch to accommodate my design. I plasma cut the counter top out of 10 gauge HRS, and finished it with beeswax. If you look close, you can see the cord grommet that I incorporated.

Hope you like it!

PS… I know my photos suck, but you get the idea!

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Dream car, but maybe in putty white…

Dream car, but maybe in putty white…

(Source: dubsnbabes)